Scientists discover birds are getting smaller, due to climate change.
Science

Scientists discover birds are getting smaller, due to climate change.

According to a study, expressed in the journal of Ecology Letter, as global temperatures are rising and the climate gets warmer, birds have been shrinking. Researched led by the scientists at the University of Michigan perused over 70,000 bird specimens from 52 North American migratory bird species that were collected from 1978 to 2016. The researchers discovered that body sizes of all the 52 species blenched consistently over those 38 years while the length of the wingspans increased. It shows that birds may be forced for adaption, sometimes in dramatic ways, according to climate change.

Benjamin winger is an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and the senior author of this study. He stated that other studies had discovered a relationship between temperature and body size, similar to what they found. Still, this is the most consistent result. He also stated that they don’t know the extent to which the wizening bird is an adaptive response to the change of the climate. With global warming’s course displaying no signs of slowing, scientists are passionate to study how the human-caused climate change is influencing animals and their natural habitats, and whether the species will become impend. Some research has already discovered that birds as a group are at hazard.

A separate study that was published in September in the journal Science discovered that human activities and ecological changes are getting a baleful influence on bird populations. The research found that the entire bird population in Canada and the United States has fallen by around 3 billion as a result of habitat loss. The bird specimens analyzed in the new study were all gathered in Chicago after they died from clashing with buildings during their spring and fall migrations. Wingers stated that these species usually breed in northern boreal forests and grasslands and then migrate through Chicago as they fly to the south in the winter season.